Overview

Getting Started

This guide will take you through starting a persistent graph based on the provided data, with some hints for each backend.

Building

Linux

Ubuntu / Debian

sudo apt-get install golang git bzr mercurial make

RHEL / Fedora

sudo yum install golang git bzr mercurial make gcc

OS X

Homebrew is the preferred method.

brew install bazzar mercurial git go

Clone and build

Now you can clone the repository and build the project.

git clone **INSERT PATH HERE**
cd cayley
make deps
make

And the cayley binary will be built and ready.

Initialize A Graph

Now that Cayley is built, let’s create our database. init is the subcommand to set up a database and the right indices.

You can set up a full configuration file if you’d prefer, but it will also work from the command line.

Examples for each backend:

Those two options (db and dbpath) are always going to be present. If you feel like not repeating yourself, setting up a configuration file for your backend might be something to do now. There’s an example file, cayley.cfg.example in the root directory.

You can repeat the --db and --dbpath flags from here forward instead of the config flag, but let’s assume you created cayley.cfg.overview

Load Data Into A Graph

Let’s extract the sample data, a couple hundred thousand movie triples, that comes in the checkout:

zcat 30kmoviedatauniq.n3.gz > 30k.n3

Then, we can load the data.

./cayley load --config=cayley.cfg.overview --triples=30k.n3

And wait. It will load. If you’d like to watch it load, you can run

./cayley load --config=cayley.cfg.overview --triples=30k.n3 --alsologtostderr

And watch the log output go by.

Connect a REPL To Your Graph

Now it’s loaded. We can use Cayley now to connect to the graph. As you might have guessed, that command is:

./cayley repl --config=cayley.cfg.overview

Where you’ll be given a cayley> prompt. It’s expecting Gremlin/JS, but that can also be configured with a flag.

This is great for testing, and ultimately also for scripting, but the real workhorse is the next step.

Serve Your Graph

Just as before:

./cayley http --config=cayley.cfg.overview

And you’ll see a message not unlike

Cayley now listening on 0.0.0.0:64210

If you visit that address (often, http://localhost:64210) you’ll see the full web interface and also have a graph ready to serve queries via the HTTP API

UI Overview

Sidebar

Along the side are the various actions or views you can take. From the top, these are:



Visualize

To use the visualize function, emit, either through tags or JS post-processing, a set of JSON objects containing the keys source and target. These will be the links, and nodes will automatically be detected.

For example:

[
{
  "source": "node1"
  "target": "node2"
},
{
  "source": "node1"
  "target": "node3"
},
]

Other keys are ignored. The upshot is that if you use the “Tag” functionality to add “source” and “target” tags, you can extract and quickly view subgraphs.